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Then come together again so that Satan will not tempt you because of your lack of self-control. (NIV) For the most part, religious traditions in the world reserve marriage to heterosexual unions, but there are exceptions including certain Buddhist and Hindu traditions, Unitarian Universalist, Metropolitan Community Church and some Anglican dioceses and some Quaker, United Church of Canada and Reform and Conservative Jewish congregations.

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As a sexual orientation, heterosexuality is "an enduring pattern of emotional, romantic, and/or sexual attractions" to persons of the opposite sex; it "also refers to a person's sense of identity based on those attractions, related behaviors, and membership in a community of others who share those attractions." Someone who is heterosexual is commonly referred to as straight.

Heterosexual symbolism dates back to the earliest artifacts of humanity, with gender symbols, ritual fertility carvings, and primitive art.

This was later expressed in the symbolism of fertility rites and polytheistic worship, which often included images of human reproductive organs, such as lingam in Hinduism.

It continues to influence the development of the modern concept of sexual orientation, and can be used to describe individuals' sexual orientation, sexual history, or self-identification.

Some reject the term heterosexual, as they feel that the word only refers to one's sexual behavior and does not refer to non-sexual romantic feelings.

However, the history of human sexuality shows that attitudes and behavior have varied across societies.

According to major studies, 89% to 98% of people have had only heterosexual contact within their lifetime; Similarly, a survey by the UK Office for National Statistics (ONS) in 2010 found that 95% of Britons identified as heterosexual, 1.5% of Britons identified themselves as homosexual or bisexual, and the last 3.5% gave more vague answers such as "don't know", "other", or did not respond to the question. Asked to place themselves on the Kinsey scale, 72% of all adults, and 46% of adults aged 18–24 years, picked a score of zero, meaning that they identify as totally heterosexual.

The term "heterosexual" was first published in 1892 in C. Chaddock's translation of Krafft-Ebing's "Psychopathia Sexualis". The noun came into use from the early 1920s, but did not enter common use until the 1960s.

The colloquial shortening "hetero" is attested from 1933.

These religions tend to view all sexual relations as sinful, and promote celibacy.

Other religions view heterosexual relationships as being inferior to celibacy.

In the same way, the husband's body does not belong to him alone but also to his wife.